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2018 WORKSHOP:
THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF TRAUMA
A Workshop by Janina Fisher, PhD
February 16, 2018, 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

Recent developments in neuroscience research and the evolution of new treatment techniques offer some hopeful answjanina fisher phders to the puzzling and frustrating challenges of treating patients with histories of trauma and neglect: troubled interpersonal relationships, autonomic dysregulation, loss of hope or energy, and self-destructive and addictive behavior. This workshop will use a neurobiological lens for looking at traumatized individuals carrying a range of diagnoses, exploring the implications of this perspective on treatment, and presenting the latest advances in effective interventions. When the symptoms are “decoded” in this way, even the most self-destructive, therapy-destructive, and treatment-resistant behavior becomes comprehensible and treatable.

Using lecture, experiential exercises, and demonstration, participants will learn how to make sense of trauma-based symptoms from a neurobiological perspective and how to use that understanding to choose the most effective treatment.

Janina Fisher, Ph.D. obtained her M.Ed. at Harvard University School of Education and her Ph.D. at Boston College and completed pre- and postdoctoral fellowships at Cambridge Hospital in Cambridge, MA.. She is a licensed Clinical Psychologist and Instructor at the Trauma Center, an outpatient clinic and research center founded by Bessel van der Kolk. Known for her expertise as both a clinician and consultant, she is also past president of the New England Society for the Treatment of Trauma and Dissociation, an EMDR International Association Credit Provider, a faculty member of the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy Institute, and a former Instructor, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Fisher has authored a number of publications and lectures nationally and internationally on topics related to the integration of the neurobiological research and newer trauma treatment paradigms into traditional therapeutic modalities.

 

 

PAST WORKSHOPS

2017 WORKSHOP:
THE ART AND SCIENCE OF RISING: RESILIENCE UNDER STRESS
A Workshop by Maria Sirois, PsyD

Contact Maria

Dr. Maria Sirois is an inspirational speaker, consultant, and licensed clinical psychologist who has worked in the fields of wellness and positive psychology for twenty years.

As a lecturer and motivational speaker, Maria has been invited to keynote at conferences for wellness organizations, businesses, hospitals, hospices, religious and philanthropic institutions internationally. A master storyteller, her lectures and workshops combine powerful and moving anecdotes with rigorous research to enable teams, families and individuals to build a work life and a home life of capacity, grit, meaning and happiness. Addressing topics as diverse as “The Art and Science of Resilience,” “Flourishing No Matter What,” and “A Course in Happiness,” she has been called both a “true teacher,” and “an orator of great power and beauty.”

Recently, she has created a webinar series for presenters, keynoters, teachers and workshop leaders who seek to enable audiences to successfully sustain positive transformation.  Teaching for Transformation combines the wisdom of positive psychology with the art of mastery teaching and attendees from around the world have begun to implement her understandings of how to craft a program so that audiences are informed, deeply inspired, and motivated to integrate habit change.

Her clinical work brings the bounty of positive psychology and mind/body medicine to families and children facing terminal illness, and to the staff who care for them. Trained at the New England Deaconness Mind/Body Clinic (Boston, Mass.) and at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (Boston, Mass.) she currently works as a consultant to families, psychology staffs and hospital and hospice organizations. She received her doctorate from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology in 1993.

An author as well, Maria has published two works:  A Short Course in Happiness After Loss (and Other Dark, Difficult Times) brings together the science of positive psychology and the art of resilience to offer a curriculum of sorts for those who are seeking strength, uplift and meaning while wrestling with the harshness of life.  Each reflection offers wisdom and practical guidance for those who are suffering from pain, loss, shock, managing chronic stress, or experiencing the disappointments and loneliness of life.

“Every Day Counts: Lessons in Love, Faith and Resilience From Children Facing Illness is the tale of Maria’s psychology internship at Dana-Farber. Every Day Counts brings to us the wisdom of the children she treated, wisdom that reminds us in essence that there is no time but now to live life with an open heart. Fearless when facing the suffering of our children, and determined to bring forth the gifts they offer, it is a book, as Paul Newman has written, “{of} great courage, something to lean on in tough times.” Compassion abounds in this book, for the children, for those that love them, and for the caregivers of our world.

2016 WORKSHOP:
HARNESSING MINDFULNESS: FITTING THE PRACTICE TO THE PERSON
A Workshop by Ronald Siegel, PsyD

MDr. Ron Siegelindfulness is not a one-size-fits-all remedy. Researchers are now differentiating the effects of focused attention, open monitoring, loving-kindness, compassion, and equanimity practices. This workshop will explore seven important choice points to consider when deciding when and if to introduce different practices into work with individuals with different needs. About the Presenter

Ronald D. Siegel, PsyD, is Assistant Professor of Psychology, Part Time, at Harvard Medical School, where he has taught for over 30 years. He is a long-time student of mindfulness meditation and serves on the board of directors and faculty of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy.

Dr. Siegel teaches internationally about mindfulness and psychotherapy and mind–body treatment, has worked for many years in community mental health with inner-city children and families, and maintains a private practice in Lincoln, Massachusetts. He is the coauthor of Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain, which integrates Western and Eastern approaches for treating chronic back pain, coeditor of the acclaimed books for professionals, Mindfulness and Psychotherapy and Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy: Deepening Mindfulness in Clinical Practice, and coauthor of the professional text, Sitting Together: Essential Skills for Mindfulness-based Psychotherapy.

2015 WORKSHOP:
SELF-COMPASSON AND EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE
A Workshop by Kristin Neff, PhD 
For Kristin Neff PhDmany years self-esteem was seen to be the key to psychological health.  However, research psychologists have identified several downsides to the endless pursuit of self-esteem such as constant social comparisons, and instability of self-worth. Research suggests that self-compassion is a healthier way of relating to oneself, offering all the benefits of self-esteem without its downsides. Self-compassion involves treating ourselves kindly, like we would a good friend we cared about. Rather than continually judging and evaluating ourselves, self-compassion involves generating kindness toward ourselves as imperfect humans, and learning to be present with the inevitable struggles of life with greater ease. It motivates us to make needed changes in our lives not because we’re worthless or inadequate, but because we care about ourselves and want to lessen our suffering. This workshop will provide simple tools for responding in a kind, compassionate way whenever we are experiencing painful emotions. We all want to avoid pain, but letting it in—and responding compassionately to our own imperfections without harsh self-condemnation—are essential steps toward living happier, more fulfilling lives. Through discussion, meditation, and experiential exercises, you will gain practical skills to help bring self-compassion into your daily life. You will learn how to stop being so hard on yourself; handle difficult emotions with greater ease; and motivate yourself with kindness rather than criticism. Practices will also be introduced to help ease stress for caregivers.  This course is relevant for the general public as well as to practicing mental health professionals. About the Presenter Kristin Neff, PhD, received her doctorate in Human Development from the University of California at Berkeley in 1997. She is currently an Associate Professor of Human Development and Culture at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over a decade ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles on the topic, she is author of the book Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, released by William Morrow in 2011.  Kristin’s work has received extensive media coverage, including the New York Times, MSNBC, National Public Radio, Reader’s Digest, and Psychology Today.  She offers workshops on self-compassion worldwide, and has developed an eight-week program to help people learn to be more self-compassionate in daily life. Information on self-compassion – including videos, guided meditations, exercises, research articles, and a way to test your own self-compassion level – is available at www.self-compassion.org. Kristin is also featured in the bestselling book and award-winning documentary The Horse Boy (www.horseboyworld.com), which chronicles her family’s journey to Mongolia where they trekked on horseback to find healing for her autistic son.